How to help Japan

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Image from Boing Boing, which has had some really interesting coverage today.

There’s something that hits a little home with George Takai’s hashtag #WeAreAllJapanese. Whether or not you have any intention of visiting Japan or learning the language, there’s no denying the fact that if you’ve been a reader of this blog, you probably have an unnatural amount of interest in those cartoons that Japan creates and that are so infused with their cultural qualities. So it’s… funny. I don’t know if that’s the right word, but while the world be “Japanese” today… you, me, and all those anime fans out there, it hits a slightly closer to “home”, because hey, we were all a tiny bit “Japanese” even before the Sendai Earthquake. So when I hear of firsthand accounts and see the tweets from fellow bloggers located in Japan, the picture they paint is a picture I can clearly see inside my head.

So with that said, how can you help Japan? The quickest, and realistically, most useful way is to donate to those organizations that are supporting the rescue and recovery efforts. Every little bit helps. Sounds cliché, but it is true. Because the small donations add up quickly.

  • I instinctively donated to the American Red Cross out of habit. You can donate to them by visiting their web site, or to donate a quick $10, text REDCROSS to 90999
  • Global Giving is another reputable organization, which other bloggers like Executive Otaku and Shinmaru. Again, you can either visit their web site and donate whatever amount that you want or you can text JAPAN to 50555 to quickly donate $10.

On a non-giving front, if you’re looking or helping others looking for people in Japan, try Google’s Person Finder, which is really an amazing bit of technology.

And beyond that, it’s just praying and hoping that the injured recover and the missing are found alive, that the aftershocks end soon and without much more damage, and that Japan can go back on the mend as quickly as possible.

UPDATE – just a quick update here, but donating directly to an organization with an existing base of operations in Japan might be the most efficient way to donate. A couple good ones are: